Sense & Sensibility: 2nd Discussion

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WELCOME TO THE 2nd DISCUSSION!

How are you liking S&S so far?? I hope you are just eating it up! I keep reading the volumes in one or two sittings and then waiting the rest of the week for the discussion so that I’m not ahead!

I noticed that y’all led your own discussion for the 1st one so I won’t include too many tough questions because I’m sure that you have had some crazy reactions to the many twists and turns Volume 2 has led us through!

Again, thank you so much for being here, I appreciate everyone and every comment posted!

 

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

  1. Virtually at the heart (of the novel) Marianne muffles a scream in response to the letter from Willoughby. At losing their respective loves, Marianne screams (although muffled) while Elinor suffers in silence, but they both do suffer emotionally. What are the causes that lead both women to suffer? And what does Marianne’s muffling of her own scream indicate about her character in comparison to the first half of the novel and then the second half?
  2. One of my favorite lines is in chapter 23 about Elinor. “She was stronger alone, and her own good sense so well supported her, that her firmness was as unshaken, her appearance of cheerfulness as invariable, as with regrets so poignant and so fresh, it was possible for them to be.” I admire Elinor’s strength so much throughout the novel (so far). Name a character and a trait they have that you admire.
  3. Why do you think Lucy shared this quite intimate confidence about her and Edward to Elinor?
  4. Both Elinor and Marianne are very close opposites. However, they both are similar in one aspect: protective over each other and their family. How do the sisters react to their protective instincts? (hint: though they are similar in this one instance, they react quite differently)
  5. I couldn’t help but swoon after Colonel Brandon, in chapter 27, says, “to your sister I wish all imaginable happiness; to Willoughby that he may endeavor to deserve her.” Just out of curiosity, which Austen man are you rooting for in S&S?
  6. How did you react to Willoughby’s letter in chapter 29? Tell me all of your thoughts!
  7. Have your feelings toward Marianne changed after this hard blow?
  8. What is one of your favorite humor moments/quotes in Volume 2 that Austen includes? (I know; this one is hard there are so many!)
  9. How did you react to the “inset story”, the one Colonel Brandon tells in chapter 31?
  10. Curiosity question #2: In chapter 32, my dislike for Lucy Steele grew and I wanted to smack her. Did you feel the same?
  11. Curiosity question #3: It is revealed that John Dashwood does in fact have some guilt about his sisters and their well-being. He also mentions that he believes Elinor and Colonel Brandon to be married soon. Thoughts? Desires? More thoughts? 😉

Good luck!

Comment away!

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58 thoughts on “Sense & Sensibility: 2nd Discussion

  1. Sydney K says:

    Q2- I actually quite like Elinor’s firm sense & Strength, and that quote highlights it beautifully. But I really like Edward & his hidden kindness. He doesn’t want to hurt anyone. Sometimes shyness is kind of endearing and i think Edward is an example of that.

    Q3 – I firmly believe she is doing it onpurpose and out of a mean spirit.

    Q5- I am rooting for both Colonel Brandon & Edward. I want the best for him, i hope he ends up with someone who wil love and challenge him and not walk all over him. And i want the best for Brandon because he is sweet and always supportive.

    I don’t remember exactly where some of my favorite humor lines were but they were said by Mrs. Jennings bc she is the epitome of an old lady that lost her filter.

    Liked by 3 people

    • thereadingrebel says:

      Mrs. Jennings is such a wonderful character. She is so funny and so kind. When she finds out what Willoughby has done to Marianne she supports her totally and is trying to cheer her up which Marianne who is a brat at the moment doesn’t understand.

      I am rooting for Colonel Brandon to get with Marianne. I think his steadiness and understanding would rub off onto her. Edward is perfect for Elinor and have always thought him an underrated character because he isn’t a strong character. Is he my favorite character no but still I think JA made an unlikely hero in him and Brandon and broke some stereotypes making them the heroes and Willoughby the villain of the piece.

      Elinor is an amazing heroine and always have felt she was underrated. Everyone seems to love Elizabeth(don’t get me wrong she is one of my favorite characters ever)and Emma(she was one of disliked characters ever)and don’t see the quiet strength of Elinor. She holds her whole family together. No other JA Heroine has to do that.

      Liked by 3 people

      • spines in a line says:

        I wasn’t sure about Mrs. Jennings at first because I know if I was in these girls’ place, I’d hate being ridiculed and teased so much. But it really touched me to see how caring she is. She clearly loves these girls and wants the best for them and I really love that she’s able to be such a motherly figure for them, where their own mother is often lacking.

        Liked by 1 person

      • thereadingrebel says:

        I came from a family of teasers and jokers(one of my uncle’s it’s almost impossible to take anything he says seriously). When I mean my whole family I mean my whole family(are Thanksgiving and Christmases were a site to be seen). That’s how we show love in my family so I am used to it and think nothing of it. Maybe that’s why I like Mrs. Jennings so much because I understand that side of her character.

        Liked by 2 people

      • thehuntforpaperbacks says:

        Okay, I’m glad you noticed that too. Mrs. Jennings, we all know she has flaws, but she’s trying to brighten up Marianne’s predicament and is actually very thoughtful and caring during this time to her. But Marianne is just so self-absorbed that she doesn’t think she needs to be polite and kind in return. That’s probably what bugs me the most about Marianne.

        Liked by 1 person

    • thehuntforpaperbacks says:

      Definitely agree with you that even though Edward isn’t as bold characterized as other Jane Austen heroes, I do love his kindness. It doesn’t shine as brilliantly as Marianne’s passion or Mrs. Jennings’ humor, but I think it’s kind of cool that Austen does this for this particular story. AND YES about Mrs. Jennings’ filter. She is probably one of the kindest ladies ever in Austen, but she has a flaw (her filter) that kind of deters the kindness sometimes! haha. Gotta love her though!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Elizabeth says:

    Q3. Lucy told Elinor to get a reaction. She had heard so much about her that she was worried and was basically staking her claim on Edward.

    Q5. I’ve always rooted for Brandon. He conducts himself properly at all times with compassion and empathy even when he believes he has lost Marianne.

    Q7. Marianne has always made me react differently. I dislike her because she has no sense or decorum. She makes no effort to control her impulses and often acts in her own interests with no regard for anyone else. However I also feel sympathy because of what is done to her and I want her to be happy.

    The beauty of Austen’s writing is that she can evoke so much from her readers.

    Liked by 2 people

    • tracey mandavy says:

      totally agree with you there on q.3 Elizabeth, Lucy purposely would always bring it up to rub Elinor’s nose in it. You can actually feel Elinor’s heartbreaking through the pages when she hears of Lucy and Edwards engagement.

      Liked by 2 people

      • thereadingrebel says:

        I agree with both of you on Lucy telling Elinor to get a reaction and see if she had a rival in Elinor. Lucy is horrid. I feel so bad for Elinor. To have it bought up again and again and forced to look like you only wish them happy. Elinor suffers in silence. I also feel bad when Marianne and Mrs. Dashwood still say and act like Elinor is going to be married to Edward and her honor dictates that she keep Lucy’s secret and not tell them.

        Liked by 1 person

      • brennan45 says:

        I mean Lucy outright said she was a jealous woman to Elinor. As soon as she found out Edward spent time with the Dashwoods she told Elinor her secret. Poor Elinor my heart broke for her daytime Lucy spoke of the engagement or when Marianne tried to get Edward to stay until Lucy had left. How awkward was it when he came into the room? Surely at this stage he doesn’t know that Elinor knows of the engagement so I don’t understand why he wouldn’t just talk to poor Elinor(not with Lucy in the room but to come back later when Lucy was gone)

        Liked by 2 people

    • Chanda says:

      I agree with everything you said. Lucy does it to see Elinor’s reaction and basically makr her territory. Lucy in one of the worst characters you meet in any of Jane Austen’s novels in my opinion.

      Brandon is the one of the only characters in S&S that I like throughout the entire novel.

      Again with Marianne, she bother’s me but I feel sympathy for her.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Kim P. says:

    I’m jumping to Q8… can we just talk about the Palmers? I chuckle every time they make an appearance. Mrs. Palmer is absolutely clueless (or determinedly cheerful) and Mr Palmer is hysterical. I can’t image what induced him to matrimony. But they provide a lot of comic relief, each in their own way.

    Liked by 2 people

    • thereadingrebel says:

      I do love Mrs.Palmer and think she is just a cheerful person that makes the best of everything. I don’t like Mr. Palmer being so rude to his wife. He choose Mrs. Palmer and should at least be civil to her. I do admit I love him saying that all babies look the same and Mrs. Jennings trying to get him to say the kid looks like him and all his relatives.

      Liked by 1 person

    • thehuntforpaperbacks says:

      We could talk about how funny the Palmers are ALL DAY! They are really interesting as a couple and even more so when you consider them separately. I’m SO glad you think Mr. Palmer is hysterical. I completely agree with you, he is probably one of my favorite characters simply because his attitude is so opposite from everyone else’s (especially his wife’s and her family). LOVE this.

      Like

  4. always.halloweenish says:

    Colonel Brandon is my favourite on many levels. I love the he is written and the way he speaks. Personally if none the girls want him I’ll take him hehe

    Willoughby is a coward and fake. I was floored to read what he wrote to Marianne, that i had to read it twice.
    I also think Marianne may have exaggerated their relationship.

    Liked by 4 people

    • thereadingrebel says:

      Colonel Brandon is one of my favorite Austen heroes. Elinor at least sees he is good person and I love their friendship.

      Willoughby is a jerk. I can’t stand him. He is one of my most hated characters in Austen. I don’t think that Marianne exaggerated their relationship. It looked to everyone like they were going to get engaged. He showed her the house,gave her a horse,and showed such a pointed attraction to her that is she got the wrong idea and he was just toying with her it wasn’t her fault.She thought they were getting together. That letter was horrible and I don’t see how you could write something like that to someone you loved or respected or thought of as a friend. He acted like she made it up when we all know he was just as responsible as her.

      What he did to Colonel Brandon’s ward was even worse. He seduced and left a 17yo girl alone in city with no friends and no way of contacting him. What a worthless human being he is.

      Liked by 3 people

      • spines in a line says:

        I agree with you, Willoughby clearly misled her and it’s terrible of him to now put all the blame on Marianne. I’m just having a hard time understanding why he would do this. He’s in good standing with the families around the area, and in this time reputation meant everything. What exactly did he think he would gain by leading Marianne on?

        Liked by 2 people

      • thereadingrebel says:

        I really don’t know what he was thinking. Was he thinking only that he was stuck down there with an old-fashioned cousin and when he meet Marianne he thought she was so fun and lively why not pass the time with a little flirting. My question is why did he seduce a girl and leave her pregnant and fallen? He had so many other women who want him. why ruin someone’s life like that just for a roll in hay? Or was he just thinking of himself which seems to be his default setting.

        Liked by 2 people

      • brennan45 says:

        I love Colonel Brandon. I didn’t see it until this volume though. I just can’t get over Willoughby and how sly and manipulative he is. I mean I get marrying someone for their money but what would he get out of seducing Brandon’s ward? Or am I thinking too much into it and he just wanted a quick roll in the hay as thereadingrebel suggested?

        Liked by 3 people

  5. spines in a line says:

    For Q3/Q10, I’ve been thinking a lot about the Steeles and how I feel about them. I know a couple people in this group have said how much they dislike them but I was drawn back to what someone said in the first discussion about these sisters being set up as foils to the Dashwoods.

    Since the Dashwoods are our main characters/narrators in a sense, the Steeles are therefore our closest thing to a villian in this story but because of this biased portrayal as we see them through the Dashwoods’ eyes, I’ve really being trying to get a better sense of who they really are.

    Before the Edward affair is revealed, Elinor still takes a disliking to them, largely it seems because they are uneducated and so she feels superior to them. I’m not sure what Jane Austen’s feelings on this topic were, but from this book it seems she would’ve held this superior view which unfortunately paints the Steeles in a very unfair light. I tried to detach my opinions of the Steeles from Elinor’s disgust(?) but then of course Lucy’s secret was revealed.

    At first, I absolutely felt the same way as many of you. Lucy is terrible and she’s purposefully boasting to Elinor to make her feel bad. It certainly seemed that she at least suspected that Elinor liked Edward and for whatever reason Lucy was determined to make Elinor feel badly. As Elinor is my favourite character so far, and largely the main character in our story, of course I didn’t like anyone who would attack her like this.

    But then I tried to think of it from Lucy’s POV. The two sets of sisters obviously don’t really get on well, and I’m sure the Dashwoods have not completely hidden their contempt for the lack of the Steeles’ education. But now, Lucy has something that she can hold over Elinor. She has won the hand of a respectable, fairly wealthy man so she finally has something to show for herself. In this light, I felt like it was more of Lucy trying to prove herself to Elinor, that despite Elinor’s feelings of superiority they were on some level ground as they had both fancied the same man and Lucy was now to marry him.

    This got very long but I’ve really been thinking hard on this and how our narrator may lead us astray from a more unbiased opinion. I still don’t particularly like Lucy. She can be quite annoying, and constantly rubbing Elinor’s face in her own happiness is extremely unfair but I keep trying to think of what circumstances have led her here.

    Liked by 2 people

    • thereadingrebel says:

      Great Post. I love how you think seeing the Steeles from Elinor’s eyes makes us see them badly and agree with you on some level. I have never hated Anne Steele really. I more pity her. She is uneducated,not pretty,and poor which back then was the worst 3 things you could be if you were a women. She is already almost 30 so her chances of marrying aren’t great. I do hate Lucy I can see why you think she is trying to prove herself to Elinor but don’t agree with that. She has a cruelness to her. She doesn’t just tell Elinor she torments her with the fact she has Edward. She doesn’t just want to talk about how good a man he is and how she is looking forward to a life with him. She seems to love to show up Elinor and hurt her over and over again. It’s the way she words things that makes me see her as cruel.

      Liked by 1 person

      • spines in a line says:

        I definitely think Lucy is cruel and she’s deliberately tormenting Elinor. When I say that she’s trying to prove herself to Elinor, I mean that she’s doing it through this cruelty, believing that she finally has something to hold over Elinor’s head that in some way proves her own superiority.

        I don’t know that seeing Lucy in this light has made me like her more, but it certainly makes me think about the kind of person she’d be if she had the kind of background Elinor has.

        Liked by 1 person

      • thereadingrebel says:

        I don’t know how Lucy would be if she had Elinor’s background. But I do think she would still have a meanness of spirit. Many people are just born like that. Anne I think would still have a sillyness but not like she is now and better judgement.

        Liked by 1 person

      • brennan45 says:

        I think the Steeles were set up to be the polar opposites to the Dashwoods. At first I didn’t think there was anything behind Lucy telling Elinor of her engagement but after reading this volume I am like yup she had a motive behind telling Elinor. I just thought she was doing it because she was jealous I never thought that Lucy told Elinor because she wanted to be better than Elinor at something. Thanks for opening my eyes to that one spinesinaline!

        Liked by 3 people

      • thehuntforpaperbacks says:

        Side comment. It is rather humorous that Anne Steele repeatedly brings up beaus! I certainly pity her situation and station in life now but it’s kind of funny that she loves talking about beaus! She reminds me of Kitty and Lydia from P&P.

        Liked by 1 person

      • thereadingrebel says:

        Anne Steele is way more vulgar then Lydia and Kitty. But they do all have an obsession with boys. But Anne is 29 and Lydia and Kitty are teenagers. Anne sometimes seems younger then she is. Some of the stuff she says is more teenage then adult.

        Liked by 1 person

      • brennan45 says:

        I did find it weird that Anne kept bringing up Beaus. I mean it makes sense for 17 year old Marianne to be like that. But Anne is a lot older so surely she would have more decorum in regards to “beaus”. Anne is this volume began to remind me of someone I know who should have more sense but still acts like a boy crazy teenager.

        Is it just me or do other people, when they are reading the book, find similarities between characters and people they know?

        Liked by 3 people

      • thereadingrebel says:

        I do that. Find common traits between characters and people I know. Fanny and John remind me a bit of my grandfather’s brother and his wife. They thought they were better then everyone and were really into money.

        Sir John and Mrs. Jennings are great jokers so they remind me of my family holidays.

        Jane Bennet from P&P reminds me of my mother. I don’t want to say to much about her character until next month but every time I read about her I think of my mother.

        Like

    • thehuntforpaperbacks says:

      Wow these are great thoughts. I think you are certainly right about the unbiased opinion on the Steeles. Though we are naturally led to dislike them from the author, if we removed that, we could certainly see a woman who is not education, has no talents to speak of, and is very low in society, yet wants to prove that she is valued? or means something besides her society-based status. That she has found a respectable man in society that she is to be married to. Maybe she’s trying to prove herself.

      I still don’t like her much, especially because she taunts Elinor about her “word” that they wouldn’t be going to town and about the engagement, but it’s certainly refreshing to see this from Lucy’s point of view. Thank you so much for this! 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  6. spines in a line says:

    Q5 I really like Brandon and I hope he ends up happy! However…I really don’t want him to end up with Marianne 😛
    I still don’t feel that Marianne’s feelings to him could develop beyond a friendship (and it’s a weak friendship currently as she really hasn’t interacted with him).

    And Brandon, he is annoying me because he loves Marianne simply from seeing her. He’s never been in a conversation with her, she’s never given him the slightest inclination that she even thinks fondly of him, and he’s still hanging on! What are you doing, man?
    Marianne’s not interested and Brandon seems to be in love with her solely for superficial reasons. I also have a problem with big age gaps, though I know that’d be common in this time. Not that I find Brandon old, surely not as old as Marianne finds him, but he’s fallen in “love” (or infatuation as it seems more like) with a child.

    It does make more sense after Brandon’s story that he may be more drawn to Marianne because she reminds him of his past love. But that’s a memory, Brandon, and I need you to get over it! This is a completely different girl and she does not feel the same way.

    Safe to say, I’ll be upset if Brandon ends up with Marianne. Not that I think he should end up with Elinor necessarily. They make very good friends and I hope that keeps up, though wouldn’t it be nice, and perhaps out of sorts for this crowd, to be such good friends with your spouse!

    Wow, my answers are long this week!

    Liked by 2 people

    • thehuntforpaperbacks says:

      Dang, your comments are blowing my mind here. I totally agree with you that Brandon seems to be basing his fondness for Marianne over a past love… If I was Marianne and found out Brandon liked me because I reminded him of another person similar to me, I don’t even know how I’d react to that! Interesting things here…

      Liked by 1 person

  7. tracey mandavy says:

    Q.5 rooting for Brandon all the way. He has been nothing but nice to both Dashwood ladies, he has always something nice to say about Marianne, even though she doesn’t really deserve him or his affection, at the end of part II she was almost disgusted in his appearance when ever he would come to the house, all he want to show her he wanted nothing but the best for her. l feel Marianne is to immature to be even thinking about marriage. she reminds me of a modern day boy crazy teenager, where she fixated her affection on one boy and when he moved on or his affection was not returned in the way she had hoped for she crumbled……or maybe l am heartless or jaded can’t decide

    Liked by 2 people

    • thereadingrebel says:

      The thing is she is a teenage only 17 and this is her first love. She is one of the most immature of the Austen heroines(Catherine from Northanger Abbey is the other one). Colonel Brandon is one of the kindest ad respectable characters in Austen IMO.

      Like

    • brennan45 says:

      I think a lot of people forget Marianne is only 17 years old so of course she is a boy crazy teenager. I felt for her when Willoughby didn’t show up at the house but was surprised at her reactions to Brandon. She is so against Brandon! As I was reading the passage where Colonel Brandon showed up to the house when Marianne was expecting Willoughby. I couldn’t help but feel that Austen is trying to set Brandon up as a replacement to Willoughby?

      It was in this volume that I started to like Colonel Brandon, especially with his reaction to the “engagement” of Marianne to Willoughby. I do see your point about Marianne being almost too immature to consider marriage but hopefully her character will gain some of Elinors sense in the next volume.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. thereadingrebel says:

    I was a little shocked that Marianne wanted to go with Mrs. Jennings to London at first considering her dislike for her. But then I thought that Marianne will do anything to get to Willoughby. She kind of worships him in a way. I felt so bad for Colonel Brandon when he came to see them in London and Marianne thought it was Willoughby.

    Willoughby is such a coward. To leave Marianne pining for him when he going off to propose to another women. Then not visiting her in town because he didn’t have the guts to man up and say we was marrying someone else. I felt so horrible for Marianne when she meet Willoughby at the ball and he pretended like she wasn’t even there. Then that letter. How could he write a letter and not man and go break up with her in person. Plus how it was written it seemed like he took joy in hurting her with every line. What do you think?

    What is Willoughby had been a better man and come as to see Marianne as soon as he knew her to be in London and broke up with her? Told her he was marrying someone else. Do you think Marianne’s reaction would have been different?

    Do you think that Willoughby ever really liked Marianne let along loved her? Was he just toying with her? I mean he showed her is house,gave her a horse, and treated her like she was the only person he wanted to be with? Was he planning to seduce her like he did poor Eliza?

    About the Duel between Colonel Brandon and Willoughby. Do you think that Colonel Brandon missed Willoughby on purpose? I mean he is a soldier and can’t imagine he isn’t a great shot. Plus a can’t imagine that Willoughby would be able to shot another person or also not be to scared to really aim at anything. What do you all think? I think he missed on purpose because of both Marianne and Eliza. He didn’t want to break both there hearts.

    Liked by 1 person

    • spines in a line says:

      Yeah, just to hear how Marianne looked after Willoughby left her at the ball sounded terrible! I definitely felt sorry for her, poor girl!

      That’s an interesting question of whether her reaction would’ve changed had Willoughby broken the news right away. I think him leaving her hanging for so long definitely added to her stress so perhaps to not have that long period of waiting wouldn’t have run her down so much.

      I don’t know that her reaction overall would’ve changed. She’s still a young girl completely infatuated with this man and I think her emotions would have overcome her any way the break-up came about. The only change I think may have happened is that Marianne would’ve been relieved of the earlier stress that came from not hearing from Willoughby.

      Liked by 1 person

      • thereadingrebel says:

        Like you I think she still would have taken it badly but the stress she put herself under expecting to see him every minute would have been gone at least. But that she would have fainted after the news I have no doubt. I was equal parts amused and sad when Marianne was saying the weather must turn and seeing in every thing a sign of a frost. Jane Austen is such a great humorist.

        Liked by 1 person

      • brennan45 says:

        I did feel sorry for poor Marianne in this volume. I mean every time someone knocked on the door she was sure it was Willoughby. Also I have not read S&S before but when Brandon came in instead of Willoughby I was like hmmm is Austen setting up Brandon to be Willoughbys replacement?

        I think Marianne would have reacted the same if Willoughby had told her sooner, I mean she was in love and convinced they were getting engaged. But I think she might have been in better health before that because she wouldn’t have been stressed waiting for gimme to arrive like you have said @spinesinaline and @thereadingrebel

        Liked by 3 people

  9. thereadingrebel says:

    another question I thought on this read was what if Edward told Elinor he was in a hidden engagement? How would that have effected the story if he told her just before Lucy broke the news to her.

    Mrs. Jennings usually likes everyone but even she disliked Mrs. John Dashwood. Where her friends are mistreated she is loyal.

    Mrs. Ferrars is surprise surprise a big witch. How did Edward turn out so well with a family like that? But then the same could be said for Colonel Brandon. His father and brother were real losers and cruel-hearted men.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Sydney K says:

      I think if Edward had told Elinor that would be really interesting but I also think that her feelings would have been decreased exponentially early on. She wouldn’t want to impose on his happiness and would want to be friends only.

      I actually really like the Juxtaposition of Mama Jennings & mama Ferrars. It shows how one acts when just with daughters and how the other with only sons.

      Liked by 2 people

      • thereadingrebel says:

        Mrs. Ferrars has a daughter also. I don’t think them having sons or daughters had anything to do with how they act toward their children. Mrs. Jennings wouldn’t have throw off her son like Mrs. Ferrars and Mrs. Ferrars would be as happy to throw off a daughter if she made her mad and married someone she didn’t want her to as a son who does the same.

        Yes I think Elinor would have tried combated her feelings better if Edward had told her or dropped her a hint. I don’t know how successful it would have been. You can’t help who you love.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Sydney K says:

        I was just stating how I think people parent differently when raising specific genders. But it’s also dependent on personality of course. But as much as none of us can help who we love, the way Elinor was raised and how she holds herself and her feelings I think she would have put feelings aside and perhaps pursued a different relationship or non at all.

        Liked by 2 people

      • brennan45 says:

        I think if Elinor knew she would have tried to hold back her feelings. I know we can’t help who we love but I think Elinor would definitely try and repress her feelings and possibly even enter into a different engagement because she would not want to break up someone’s engagement.

        Liked by 3 people

      • Sydney K says:

        I completely agree. Elinor has the kind of personality similar to Brandon. She would wish them all the happiness of the world and attempt to move on as best she could. And I’m sure with time she could have.

        Liked by 3 people

      • thereadingrebel says:

        I am not saying she would have never moved on. But I think it would have taken a while. She would have wished them happy and probablely been one of first to Congratulate them on their marriage. But she has strong feelings. I don’t think she would gotten over it as quickly as you think.

        Like

      • brennan45 says:

        I don’t think she would have got over it quickly at all. I think as you said she would be the first to congratulate them. But I feel that in an attempt to repress her feelings she might rush into an engagement to try and run away from those feelings. She would probably still carry those feelings with her for the rest of her life just never act on them.

        Liked by 1 person

  10. brennan45 says:

    Sorry for the late post guys! Life just got in the way, I work weekends so will probably be posting late on the next discussion too.

    Firstly in the first discussion I thought that Lucy was just telling Elinor with no ulterior motive. After reading volume two I think Lucy did it on purpose because she told Elinor she is a jealous person.

    Willoughby. Just. Ugh. I knew there was a reason why I didn’t like him. He reminded me of a certain someone from Pride and Prejudice(I won’t say the name because I don’t want to spoil the next book for anyone who hasn’t read it yet). For Willoughby to act like he never had any feelings for Marianne was a bit over the top. I mean he was giving her a horse? That was not all in Mariannes head. I do think she reacting a bit dramatically but she is only 17 and was convinced that they were gonna get engaged so I can see why she would act so dramatically.

    Also was it just me or did anyone else notice how the two sisters acted so differently to the way they were treated by their lovers? Elinor does not want her mother to know about Lucy and Edward but Marianne is all like “I care not who knows I am wretched”. Elinor very much grieves inside whereas Marianne is very vocal about her despair. Poor Mrs. Jennings is just trying to help and I thought Marianne wasn’t very nice towards her.

    So in this volume I began to understand Colonel Brandon’s feelings towards Marianne a bit more. But I’m still like really? Marianne has yet to show me something that makes me be like yup she deserves Brandon. When he said to Elinor “to Willoughby that he may endeavor to deserve her”. I was like be still my beating heart that was so lovely and thoughtful of a man who was watching the second woman he loved become engaged to someone else. Instead of being all bratty like Willoughby he took it on the chin and was like well if that’s what she want I want her to be happy.

    Fanny Dashwood is just a manipulative fool and I don’t even want to waste my breath on her. I love Austens wit in her narration. I mean we see her satirising her characters (herself through narration as opposed to us seeing the characters through Elionrs eyes). When Austen says “John Dashwood had not much to say for himself that was worth hearing, and his wife still less”.

    I really need to see if I can upload a picture of the illustration of Mrs. Ferrars from my book because she is an old crone and the illustration suits her perfectly.

    Liked by 2 people

    • thehuntforpaperbacks says:

      Were you reading my mind during this volume? Because I definitely thought exactly everything you put here lol.

      I feel SO bad for Elinor that Lucy keeps bringing the engagement up with her. Not only that but Lucy’s presence alone just reminds Elinor of this heartbreak that she’s going through right now. And then there’s the moment where Edward comes while Lucy and Elinor are together (Marianne coming in also). How awful would that be? Not to mention awkward because of how Marianne is being obvious with her comments about their fondness for each other in the past at Norland Park. GAH. My heart just goes out for Elinor so many times during this volume.

      And I guess for Marianne as well. You are so right with the horse, the house, and the hair. Everything looked to be that they were engaged or very intimately acquainted at that point so I can only imagine how much of a let down all of it would be. He didn’t show up when she wrote for him to, he didn’t write back at all until the final letter, and then he had to continue being a sudden less feeling man and write that he never cared for her at all. Made her feel small, crazy, and insignificant.

      So many feelings this volume! haha

      Liked by 1 person

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